Call for abstract submissions: EGU Session on atmosphere; plant & soil interactions: organic and inorganic carbon in the critical zone

We invite abstract submissions to a European Geosciences Union (EGU) session exploring organic and inorganic soil carbon across multiple soil interfaces at different spatial and temporal scales in the critical zone. Deadline for submissions is the 15th January 2020.
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We invite abstract submissions to a European Geosciences Union (EGU) session exploring organic and inorganic soil carbon across multiple soil interfaces at different spatial and temporal scales in the critical zone.

The abstract submission deadline is 15 January 2020, 12:00 GMT.

The European Geosciences Union (EGU) session will be held in Vienna between the 3rd and 8th May 2020.

As soils are one of the largest terrestrial carbon stores we need to better understand the role of carbon in all soil systems, from microbial processes at the aggregate scale to land surface processes at the catchment scale. This is particularly important as carbon cycles are facing perturbations ranging from rapid shifts in land use and management to degradation and long-term environmental and climatic change.

The EGU General Assembly will bring together soil scientists from around the world and will take place in Vienna between the 3rd and 8th May 2020. Submissions are invited from all soil and biogeosciences researchers, especially early career researchers, using empirical, modelling, or meta-analytical approaches to investigate soil carbon.

The abstract submission deadline is 15 January 2020, 12:00 GMT. Financial support from the EGU can be applied for before 1 December. For more information please visit: https://tinyurl.com/egucarbon. If you have any questions about the session, contact Chris McCloskey on C.McCloskey@cranfield.ac.uk.

Chris McCloskey, Emily Dowdeswell-Downey and Dan Evans

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